THE STORY OF The Volunteer

Dating back to the 1800s, The Volunteer is steeped in history and acted as a recruitment station during the war, representations of which can be seen on the pub’s walls today.  Rumoured to be haunted, there have been tales of flickering lights and eerie sightings of a well-dressed man in breeches and surcoat, thought to be the ghost of a wealthy Londoner whose grand house stood on the site in the 17th century.   

Nestled amongst the area’s elegant Victorian architecture, The Volunteer’s interior mixes traditional wood-panelling with period features and contemporary touches, creating a cosy yet spacious feel, an ideal spot for relaxation and refreshment. Attracting a diverse clientele, the pub reflects the civilised yet cosmopolitan vibe of its Baker Street neighbourhood and holds the authenticity of a true British local close to its heart.     

One of the most established watering holes in the Baker Street area, The Volunteer remains enduringly popular with local residents and workers alike, as well as visitors to the capital – close to multiple transport links, it’s the ideal place kick back and unwind after a hard day’s work, a visit to nearby Regent’s Park or a sightseeing trip around the capital.  

The Volunteer stands ready and willing just a few doors down from 221B Baker Street, one of the world’s most famous addresses and now the Sherlock Holmes museum.